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5 Common Google Analytics Headaches and How to Get Rid of Them

Google_analytics

Google Analytics is a free web investigation tool that gives measurements and essential diagnostic instruments for search engine optimization (SEO) and marketing purposes. The administration is accessible to anybody with a Google account.
If you are using Google Analytics as the prime tool for analysis in your website then you must ensure that it’s accurate. People generally have a misconception that using Google analytics means everything is being tracked properly by default. And due to this managing analytics via Google, at times, becomes a headache for them.
Following are the ways of getting rid of this problem:

Think about Self-referrals – All of us are familiar with self-referrals. When you find lot of traffic from your own domain, it might be an indication of some underlying problem.

To fight this problem you need to include an advanced filter, which will show if any of the sub domains are being pulled in. And, as we know, Google analytics treat sub domains hosted in other locations as separate domains. So, you need to implement cross-domain tracking so as to narrow down the sub domains that are actually creating self-referrals.

Beware Aware if you see Strangely Low Bounce Rate – An unusually low bounce rate isn’t something you should be happy about. In fact, you need to be alert as there may be some pages on your website that have the same Google Analytics tracking code installed on them twice.

To tackle this issue use Google Tag Assistant to check if the GA tracking code has been really installed more than once on any particular page on your site.

Going for iframes is not a good option – Google Analytics can simply never play with such a big technology as iframes. If you are tracking via iframes, you are just bloating the page views. Besides, there’s no clarity in the tracking.

Therefore, the best option is not to use them. They are complicated elements that will just baffle you.

Don’t Take Huge Traffic Jumps Lightly – There is a strong reason behind why is it happening, and that reason is none other than the Google Analytics tracking code.

To avoid this situation, check and make sure that the code is placed only on places where it’s absolutely necessary. You can use various tools like Google Tag Assistant or Screaming Frog to review this.

Cross-Domain Tracking – Many of us don’t know but Cross-Domain Tracking does require an additional setup with Google Analytics. Without this set up things will surely fall apart and the situation might become difficult to handle. While the set up itself is a bit tough, you can use Google Tag Manager (GTM) with Universal Analytics to simply the process.

Tracking is mostly unclear when you implement only some parts of cross-domain tracking. An unclear tracking process hinders the exchange of cookies between domains. So make sure cookies are properly passing through all the forms, links as well as smoke signals. Use the Google Analytics’ Real Time report, the Google Tag Assistant and the Google Analytics debug together to simplify this investigation.

Having issues with GA is common, but what is more common is turning a blind eye to them. We hope that this article helps you identify and deal with common Google Analytics issues.

Mridula BloggingInternet ,,,,

Google_analytics

Google Analytics is a free web investigation tool that gives measurements and essential diagnostic instruments for search engine optimization (SEO) and marketing purposes. The administration is accessible to anybody with a Google account.
If you are using Google Analytics as the prime tool for analysis in your website then you must ensure that it’s accurate. People generally have a misconception that using Google analytics means everything is being tracked properly by default. And due to this managing analytics via Google, at times, becomes a headache for them.
Following are the ways of getting rid of this problem:

Think about Self-referrals – All of us are familiar with self-referrals. When you find lot of traffic from your own domain, it might be an indication of some underlying problem.

To fight this problem you need to include an advanced filter, which will show if any of the sub domains are being pulled in. And, as we know, Google analytics treat sub domains hosted in other locations as separate domains. So, you need to implement cross-domain tracking so as to narrow down the sub domains that are actually creating self-referrals.

Beware Aware if you see Strangely Low Bounce Rate – An unusually low bounce rate isn’t something you should be happy about. In fact, you need to be alert as there may be some pages on your website that have the same Google Analytics tracking code installed on them twice.

To tackle this issue use Google Tag Assistant to check if the GA tracking code has been really installed more than once on any particular page on your site.

Going for iframes is not a good option – Google Analytics can simply never play with such a big technology as iframes. If you are tracking via iframes, you are just bloating the page views. Besides, there’s no clarity in the tracking.

Therefore, the best option is not to use them. They are complicated elements that will just baffle you.

Don’t Take Huge Traffic Jumps Lightly – There is a strong reason behind why is it happening, and that reason is none other than the Google Analytics tracking code.

To avoid this situation, check and make sure that the code is placed only on places where it’s absolutely necessary. You can use various tools like Google Tag Assistant or Screaming Frog to review this.

Cross-Domain Tracking – Many of us don’t know but Cross-Domain Tracking does require an additional setup with Google Analytics. Without this set up things will surely fall apart and the situation might become difficult to handle. While the set up itself is a bit tough, you can use Google Tag Manager (GTM) with Universal Analytics to simply the process.

Tracking is mostly unclear when you implement only some parts of cross-domain tracking. An unclear tracking process hinders the exchange of cookies between domains. So make sure cookies are properly passing through all the forms, links as well as smoke signals. Use the Google Analytics’ Real Time report, the Google Tag Assistant and the Google Analytics debug together to simplify this investigation.

Having issues with GA is common, but what is more common is turning a blind eye to them. We hope that this article helps you identify and deal with common Google Analytics issues.

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